Science Sunday 07-01-17

Colony Collapse Disorder

The ongoing concern about declines in honey bee populations worldwide recently made the news again, with a report that neonicotinoid insecticides may play a significant role in colony collapse disorder, a process wherein a healthy bee colony simply disappears (dies off) within a very short time.

Using 33 test sites in Germany, Hungary and England, the researchers determined that neonicotinoids can have a devastating effect on a honey bee colony, depending on how exclusively the bees fed on crops sprayed with these chemicals.

The above Kurzgesagt video well summarizes all the causes of colony collapse disorder, and why the disappearance of bees is such an alarming development.

Better Than Flight Simulator?

Apparently, 360 degree videos are all the rage now, and I am just catching up.  Here we see a 360 video of a complete Airbus 320 flight, from taxi through takeoff, to approach and landing.  You can swivel your view to see what is going on in the entire cockpit, and you can decide what portion of the flight you want to watch or rewatch.

Water Water Everywhere

The nature of dihydrogen oxide, commonly known as water in its liquid state, has been a subject of fascination for me for some time, so I was surprised to find out that physicists now seem firmly convinced that water has two liquid states, one below 40 degrees Celsius and one above 60 degrees Celsius.  The “interphase” range between 40 to 60 Celsius degrees is viewed as a transition range within which various properties of water change abruptly at different temperatures.

You can read about this new development here.

A Possible New Planet in Our Solar System

We all know that Pluto, which we just visited, in no longer considered a solar system planet, but has instead been demoted to the status of dwarf planet, one of five so far recognized by the International Astronomical Union.  Dwarf planets are Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs), as they reside farther out than Neptune in our solar system.  They are also called Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), as they reside at least part of the time in the Kuiper Belt, which is region in the solar system that is between 30 and 50 astronomical units (AUs) from the Sun.  An astronomical unit is roughly the average distance from the Earth to the Sun, about 93 million miles).

Now comes a new report by researchers from the University of Arizona that a distinct group of KBOs exhibit a common behavior different from most other solar system objects.  The common plane of these KBOs’ orbits are nearly 8 degrees off from the “invariable plane” of most all other solar system objects.  The researchers reason that this is due to a “Mars sized planet” heretofore undetected and residing in the outer regions of the Kuiper Belt.  The researchers are careful to point out that their hypothesized planet (and it would be a real planet if it were the size of Mars) should not be confused with another hypothesized planet, called Planet Nine, that is thought to be 10 times the size of  Earth and be much father out in the solar system (about 700 AU).

Newton’s Third Law

Veritasium has posted a video about a new “water toy” that stably suspends most any lightweight ball at the top of a vertically ascending water jet.  Apparently the jet causes the ball to spin away from it.  The ball carries the water around it in such a way that the water pushes the ball back towards the water jet, producing a hydrodynamic equilibrium state..

To quote our fearless leader, Enjoy!

 

 

Advertisements